Saturday, 17 November 2012

What is design for print: Embossing & Debossing


Embossing


Embossing uses the same principle as die stamping. A female block is produced using zinc, magnesium, copper, brass or steel. These are process engraved to one depth or hand engraved to multiple depths.
In simple terms the material to be embossed is pushed into the die using a male counterforce.
Embossing can be used to raise a printed or foiled image. It also used to “Blind Emboss” images, this raises the image on plain paper.

Embossed logos are incorporated into many corporate identities, used especially on corporate invitations, business cards, letter headings and compliment slips.

- A highly cost effective way to raise images from a plain or printed.
- Fully compatible with laser printers.
- Ideal for Invitations, business cards, letter headings and compliment slips etc.


This process is similar to die stamping but without ink. The image is engraved into the surface of the die. When the paper or card is pushed into the die the resulting image is raised above the material, i.e., embossed.

Embossing dies can be etched, to give a single depth image, or engraved in multi-levels for extra special effects. Multi level dies are sometimes referred to as sculptured dies.

Debossing 


In debossing an image such as a logo, a title, or other design is heat-pressed into the surface of the paper with a die, creating depressions or indentations rather than raised impressions as in embossing.

Embossing vs Debossing

Debossing and embossing are similar processes that create a different result. Both processes involve making a metal plate and counter. The plate is mounted on a press and the paper is stamped between the plate and counter. This force of pressure pushes the stock into the plate creating the impression. Embossing creates a raised impression on stock – pushes the image above the level of the paper. Debossing is the reverse of embossing. Debossing creates a depressed impression on stock – pushes the image below the level of the paper.

Source:
http://www.viprint.co.uk/embossing.html
http://www.frewerbrothers.co.uk/embossing.html
http://desktoppub.about.com/od/glossary/g/Debossing.htm

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