Saturday, 17 November 2012

What is design for print: Foil printing

Most foil blocking printing is done in metallic foils which can be gold, silver or metallic colours. Diffraction and special effect foils are also available for security work or to add dazzling effects. Rolls of foil are used on the press instead of ink. The raised image on the metal die is pressed against the material, with the foil between. Heat and pressure are applied to transfer the foil to the paper or card.

Fluted Foiling Dies, also known as Recess, Combination or Foil Embossing dies, are now very popular. These dies foil and emboss in one pass and can be used to enhance the product.

Foil blocking

Foil blocking has been developed using the letterpress principle. A male block is produced using zinc, magnesium, copper or brass. These are process engraved.
The block is heated on press and a metallic or coloured foil is branded on to the material. Foiled logos are incorporated into many corporate identities, used especially on corporate invitations, business cards, letter headings and compliment slips.


Foiling & Embossing

Foiling and embossing can be used on the same image, firstly foiled and then embossed. Again logos are incorporated into many corporate identities, used especially on corporate invitations, business cards, letter headings and compliment slips.

- A highly cost effective way to add metallic colour to all or part of printed products.
- Fully compatible with laser printers.
- Ideal for Invitations, business cards, letter headings and compliment slips etc.
- We can print to order on any thickness of material.
- Ideal for use in conjunction with thermography, embossing and lithography.


Foil stamping


What is Foil Stamping?
Foil stamping is a specialty printing process that uses heat, pressure, metal dies and foil film.  The foil comes in rolls in a wide assortment of colours, finishes, and optical effects.

The Printing Process
Foil stamping is somewhat similar to letterpress and engraving, in that the colour is applied to paper with pressure.  As a result, the foil process leaves a slightly raised impression on the paper.
Once the design is finalised, metal dies are created in the appropriate shape for each colour foil to be applied, and for embossing if a three-dimensional effect is desired – most commonly known as blind embossing.
The dies are heated and then stamped with enough pressure to seal a thin layer of foil to the paper.






Source:
http://www.frewerbrothers.co.uk/foilblocking.html
http://www.viprint.co.uk/foil_blocking.html
http://ohsobeautifulpaper.com/2011/04/the-printing-process-foil-stamping/

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