Monday, 19 November 2012

What is design for print: Types of binding

Coil Binding

Plastic Coil Binding is the fastest growing market segment in mechanical binding today. Plastic Coil binding is very resilient. The plastic coil behaves like a spring, so if it is twisted or bent it always returns to its original position. Plastic Coil also uses a round hole instead of a square hole. Square holes have right angles which are weak points and allow tearing. These two factors make Plastic Coil binding ideal for any application where durability is key. Plastic Coil also allows the bound pages to be turned 360¢ª, and the book can lie flat, making it ideal for business reports, manuals, menus, and workbooks. A wide variety of colors can be found to match the book's design. Inserting is very easy and can also be done by hand which makes it economical and ideal for any run length.


Perfect Binding

Perfect Binding is the application of a book block to a cover by applying hot melt glue. Perfect Binding is traditionally used on novels and most books found at your local book store. A printed, soft, wrap-around cover or a hardcover (case-bound) can be used which makes perfect binding ideal for almost any binding application over .25". Although perfect binding has typically been reserved for very large runs, with new technology from DFG, perfect binding is now more time and cost effective than other bindings from one to 1000+ books. Perfect Binding is very strong, and because printing can be put on the spine, it is ideal for stacking. Perfect binding is now not only ideal for nationwide bestsellers, it is ideal for the self published authors, personalized photo-books, catalogs, and much more.


Comb Binding

Comb Binding is the oldest and most common form of mechanical binding. Its primary feature is that sheets of paper can be removed or added. It is very common so supplies are easily accessible. The books are more rigid; however, the sheets cannot be turned 360¢ª.


Wire Binding

Wire Binding is a very elegant and decorative. It is perfect for any application where appearance is key. It can be found in different colors to match the book block. Binding is very fast and can be automated. Wire Binding is very attractive however it is not as durable as other plastic binds. The sheets can be turned 360¢ª, and when the pages are turned the sheets mirror each other because the loops do not have a pitch. Wire binding is ideal for products like calendars, financial reports, and any other premium products.


Tape Binding 

Tape binding uses a thermoplastic adhesive on a strip to bind books. In technique, it is similar to perfect binding, where the individual pages are glued to the book spine. Tape binding is a good choice for office documents, review books, or other presentations. Powis makes a number of tape binding strips, from the sturdy Super Strip to the attractive Comp Strip to the Lx-Strip, which is used with the Fastback 9 binding machine. We also make the PhotoPro strip which is designed for use with the Photobook Production Workcell.


Sewn and drawn binding

Sewn binding is usually used in conjunction with hard cover binding. The book block, or sections of the book block are sewn together prior to the addition of the cover. This makes for a very sturdy book. The biggest disadvantage to sewn binding is that it requires specialized, expensive equipment, and, when done on a custom basis, is a slow process. As an alternative to sewn binding, Powis has developed StitchFree™ technology, which is capable of producing books that rival sewn and wire-stitched books in binding strength.


Velobinding

Velobind is a punch-and-bind system that uses a two-part binding element. First the paper is punched with a series of tiny holes. One half of the binding element consists of a plastic strip with evenly spaced plastic spikes on one side. The other half of the binding element is a plastic strip with evenly spaced holes that match the punches. The spikes are pushed through one side of the paper and then fed through the plastic strip with holes. The ends of the spikes are melted off, creating the bind. A Velobound cannot be edited without rebinding.


Spiral Binding

Spiral binding—as its name suggests—is a punch-and-bind system that uses a plastic or metal spiral wire that is wound through punched holes on the binding edge. It is the type of binding most often used for school notebooks and steno pads.



PUR Binding

PUR binding is very similar to perfect binding. But uses a more durable and flexible glue. It is nearly impossible to remove pages from a PUR Bound book, and the spine doesn't deteriorate with age. Ideal for printed items that need to be durable reference tools - Catalogues, price lists, prospectus, brochures, town plans, parish plans etc



Binding Screws

Definition: Used for binding loose sheets, pillar and post screws are used to secure the printed document.

What is it used for? Commonly used for product swatches, photo albums, bespoke brochures etc

At What Point do we do it? Binding Screws are a print finishing process (after printing).

How do we do it? The pages are gathered in order, drilled, and the pillars and posts are inserted until they meet - they are secure by screwing the pillar and post together..

More about... Interscrews are available in Brass, Nickel, Black or White Plastic. Available heights for book thicknesses are 2, 3.5, 6, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 25mm.



Saddle Stitching (Saddle Wire / Stitch Trim)


Definition: Saddle Stitching is a method of binding one or more printed sections together, with or without a cover, by means of wire staples (stitches) through the spine and centrefold. Otherwise known as Booklet Making or Stitched.

What is it used for? Commonly used for Brochures, Annual Reports, Booklets, Newsletters, Price Lists, Catalogues, Parish Plans, Town Plans

At What Point do we do it? Saddle Stitching is a print finishing process (after printing).

How do we do it? Our Stitch Trimming machine will inset (gather) sections, stitch with the number and type of wire required and trim on 3 edges to the finished size.

More about... We can saddle stitch with up to 4 stitches (wires). Endorse Folding (folding in half after stitching) is possible by using our mobile knife unit, enabling thin products to be folded in half after stitching and trimming.

Loop Stitching (Loop stitch 2 wires, loop stitch 4 wires)


Definition: Loop Stitching is a method of binding one or more printed sections together, with or without a cover, by means of loop wire staples (stitches) through the spine and centrefold. The loops enable the printed item to be inserted into a Ring Binder

What is it used for? Commonly used for Brochures, Price Lists, Catalogues, Booklets, Newsletters, Parish Plans, Town Plans where they need to be inserted into 2 or 4 ring Ring Binders

At What Point do we do it? Loop Stitching is a print finishing process (after printing).

How do we do it? Our Stitch Trimming machine will inset (gather) sections, stitch with the number and type of wire required and trim on 3 edges to the finished size.

More about... We can Loop stitch with up to 4 stitches (wires).

Stab Stitching

Definition: Stab Stitching is used mainly for office documents and in essence is two or more very strong, long staples that bind together loose sheets up to 25mm thick.

What is it used for? Commonly used for Office stationery eg. NCR Pads, Purchase Order Pads, Invoice Pads, Sales Order Forms etc

At What Point do we do it? Stab Stitching is a print finishing process (after printing).

How do we do it? Loose sheets are collated, usually with a grey backboard and Manila top sheet, they are stab stitched with our stab stitching machine approx 8mm from the edge and to ensure the item is secure and presentable we then apply calico tape to the spine.



Source:
http://www.perfectbindingmachine.com/typesofbinding.html
http://www.powis.com/resources/learn/binding_types.php
http://www.printbuyingdirect.co.uk/binding.html#Saddle%20Stitching

1 comment:

  1. "Great post !!! Post is very interesting..Thanks for sharing this nice post with us !!!!!


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